ABET Accreditation

Program educational objectives

bioengineering research participants

As part of our accreditation process, ABET asks our department to capture the overall goals of the bioengineering program. These are called our educational program objectives. They are:

  • Graduates will compete effectively and favorably with peers for positions in industry, professional school, or graduate programs, as dictated by the students’ broader goals while at UIC.
  • Graduates will remain active contributors to the field of bioengineering through professional societies, service to scholarly or technical journals, alumni activities, mentoring, contributions to education or human resources, or other activities beyond the basic requirements of their occupation.
  • Graduates will demonstrate leadership in their professions, as evidenced by scholarly and technical publication or other measure of professional productivity, including awards and honors, and advancement within the organizations in which they are employed, as appropriate to the individual career path.

Student outcomes

Another part of the ABET accreditation process requires the department to identify the specific knowledge and skills that students are intended to have when they complete their undergraduate education. These are called student outcomes.

Students graduating from the bioengineering program at UIC will have:

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  3. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  4. an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  7. an ability to communicate effectively.
  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
  9. recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning.
  10. knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
  12. an understanding of biology and physiology.
  13. the capability to apply advanced mathematics (including differential equations and statistics), science, and engineering to solve problems at the interface of engineering and biology.
  14. the ability to make measurements on, and interpret data from, living systems, addressing the problems associated with the interaction between living and non-living materials and systems.